Climb Above Parkinsons
 
Photo  Credit:  Eric Simon

Photo Credit:  Eric Simon

Kilimanjaro 

Mount Kilimanjaro with its three volcanic cones, "Kibo", "Mawenzi", and "Shira", is a dormant volcano in Tanzania. It is the highest mountain in Africa, and rises approximately 4,900 metres (16,100 ft) from its base to 5,895 metres (19,341 ft) above sea level. The first persons known to have reached the summit of the mountain were Hans Meyer and Ludwig Purtscheller in 1889. The mountain is part of the Kilimanjaro National Park and is a major climbing destination.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Kilimanjaro

 

 

 
 

Aconcagua

Aconcagua (Spanish pronunciation: [akoŋˈkaɣwa]) is the highest mountain outside Asia, at 6,961 metres (22,838 ft), and by extension the highest point in both the Western Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere.[1] It is located in the Andesmountain range, in the Mendoza ProvinceArgentina, and lies 112 kilometres (70 mi) northwest of its capital, the city of Mendoza. The summit is also located about five kilometres from San Juan Province and 15 kilometres from the international border with Chile. The mountain itself lies entirely within Argentina and immediately east of Argentina's border with Chile.[3] Its nearest higher neighbor is Tirich Mir in the Hindu Kush, 16,520 kilometres (10,270 mi) away. It is one of the Seven Summits.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aconcagua

Photo  Credit:  William Marler 

Photo Credit:  William Marler 

 
 
Denali at Base Camp.   Photo  Credit:  Fletch

Denali at Base Camp.  Photo Credit:  Fletch

Denali

Denali (/dɪˈnɑːli/)[5][6] (also known as Mount McKinley, its former official name)[7] is the highest mountain peak in North America, with a summit elevation of 20,310 feet (6,190 m) above sea level. With a topographic prominence of 20,156 feet (6,144 m) and a topographic isolation of 4,629 miles (7,450 km), Denali is the third most prominent and third most isolated peak after Mount Everest and Aconcagua. Located in the Alaska Range in the interior of the U.S. state of Alaska, Denali is the centerpiece of Denali National Park and Preserve.

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denali

 
 

Vinson Massif

Vinson Massif (/ˈvɪnsən mæˈsiːf/) is a large mountain massif in Antarctica that is 21 km (13 mi) long and 13 km (8.1 mi) wide and lies within the Sentinel Range of the Ellsworth Mountains. It overlooks the Ronne Ice Shelf near the base of the Antarctic Peninsula. The massif is located about 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) from the South Pole. Vinson Massif was discovered in January 1958 by U.S. Navy aircraft. In 1961, the Vinson Massif was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN), for Carl G. Vinson, United States congressman from the state of Georgia, for his support for Antarctic exploration. On Nov. 1, 2006, US-ACAN declared Mount Vinson and Vinson Massif to be separate entities.[4][5]

Mount Vinson is the highest peak in Antarctica, at 4,892 metres (16,050 ft). It lies in the north part of Vinson Massif’s summit plateau in the south portion of the main ridge of the Sentinel Range about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) north of Hollister Peak.[5] It was first climbed in 1966. An expedition in 2001 was the first to climb via the Eastern route, and also took GPS measurements of the height of the peak.[6] As of February 2010, 1,400 climbers have attempted to reach the top of Mount Vinson.[7]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vinson_Massif

 

Vinson Massif from the North.   Photo  Credit:  Damien Gildea 

Vinson Massif from the North.  Photo Credit:  Damien Gildea 

 
 
Everest by Moonlight.   Photo  Credit:  AndrewN 

Everest by Moonlight.  Photo Credit:  AndrewN 

Mount Everest

Mount Everest, known in Nepali as Sagarmāthā and in Tibetan as Chomolungma, is Earth's highest mountain, located in the Mahalangur Himal sub-range of the Himalayas. The international border between China (Tibet Autonomous Region) and Nepal runs across its summit point.

The current official height of 8,848 m (29,029 ft), recognised by China and Nepal, was established by a 1955 Indian survey and subsequently confirmed by a Chinese survey in 1975.[1] In 2005, China remeasured the rock height of the mountain, with a result of 8844.43 m. There followed an argument between China and Nepal as to whether the official height should be the rock height (8,844 m., China) or the snow height (8,848 m., Nepal). In 2010, an agreement was reached by both sides that the height of Everest is 8,848 m, and Nepal recognises China's claim that the rock height of Everest is 8,844 m.[6]

In 1865, Everest was given its official English name by the Royal Geographical Society, upon a recommendation by Andrew Waugh, the British Surveyor General of India. As there appeared to be several different local names, Waugh chose to name the mountain after his predecessor in the post, Sir George Everest, despite George Everest's objections.[7]

Mount Everest attracts many climbers, some of them highly experienced mountaineers. There are two main climbing routes, one approaching the summit from the southeast in Nepal (known as the "standard route") and the other from the north in Tibet, China. While not posing substantial technical climbing challenges on the standard route, Everest presents dangers such as altitude sickness, weather, and wind, as well as significant hazards from avalanches and the Khumbu Icefall. As of 2016 there are well over 200 corpses on the mountain, some of which serve as landmarks.[8][9]

The first recorded efforts to reach Everest's summit were made by British mountaineers. As Nepal did not allow foreigners into the country at the time, the British made several attempts on the north ridge route from the Tibetan side. After the first reconnaissance expedition by the British in 1921 reached 7,000 m (22,970 ft) on the North Col, the 1922 expedition pushed the north ridge route up to 8,320 m (27,300 ft), marking the first time a human had climbed above 8,000 m (26,247 ft). Seven porters were killed in an avalanche on the descent from the North Col. The 1924 expedition resulted in one of the greatest mysteries on Everest to this day: George Mallory and Andrew Irvine made a final summit attempt on 8 June but never returned, sparking debate as to whether or not they were the first to reach the top. They had been spotted high on the mountain that day but disappeared in the clouds, never to be seen again, until Mallory's body was found in 1999 at 8,155 m (26,755 ft) on the north face. Tenzing Norgay and Edmund Hillary made the first official ascent of Everest in 1953, using the southeast ridge route. Tenzing had reached 8,595 m (28,199 ft) the previous year as a member of the 1952 Swiss expedition. The Chinese mountaineering team of Wang FuzhouGonpo, and Qu Yinhua made the first reported ascent of the peak from the north ridge on 25 May 1960.[10] 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Everest

 
 

Carstensz Pyramid

Puncak Jaya (Malay: [ˈpuntʃaʔ ˈdʒaja]) or Carstensz Pyramid (4,884 m) is the highest summit of Mount Jayawijaya or Mount Carstensz /ˈkɑːrstəns/ in the Sudirman Range of the western central highlands of Papua Province, Indonesia (within Puncak Jaya Regency). Other summits are East Carstensz Peak (4,808 m), Sumantri(4,870 m) and Ngga Pulu (4,863 m). Other names include Nemangkawi in the Amungkal language, Carstensz Toppen and Gunung Soekarno.[2]

At 4,884 metres (16,024 ft) above sea level, Puncak Jaya is the highest mountain in Indonesia, on the island of New Guinea (which consists of the Indonesian West Papua region plus Papua New Guinea), on the continent of Australia (which consists of New Guinea, the country of Australia, Timor, other islands, and submerged continental shelf), and in Oceania, as well as the 5th highest mountain in political Southeast Asia.

It is also the highest point between the Himalayas and the Andes, and the highest island peak in the world. Some sources claim Papua New Guinea's Mount Wilhelm, 4,509 m (14,793 ft), as the highest mountain peak in Oceania, on account of Indonesia being part of Asia (Southeast Asia).[3] The massive, open Grasberg mine is within 4 kilometers of Puncak Jaya.

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puncak_Jaya

Scary stuff on the Carstensz Pyramid.   Photo  Credit:  sutcliffe996

Scary stuff on the Carstensz Pyramid.  Photo Credit:  sutcliffe996

 
 
Mount Elbrus.   Photo  Credit:  Mike W.  

Mount Elbrus.  Photo Credit:  Mike W.  

Mount Elbrus

Mount Elbrus is the highest mountain in Russia and in Europe, and the tenth most prominent peak in the world.[6] A dormant volcano, Elbrus is in the Caucasus Mountains in Southern Russia, near the border with Georgia.

Elbrus has two summits, both of which are dormant volcanic domes. The taller west summit is 5,642 metres (18,510 ft);,[2] the east summit is 5,621 metres (18,442 ft). The east summit was first ascended on 10 July 1829 (Julian calendar) by Khillar Khachirov. His nationality is claimed both by Kabardians [7][8]and Karachay[9][10][11] and used by nationalists of both sides. He was a guide for a Imperial Russian army scientific expedition led by General Emmanuel, and the west summit (by about 20 m; 66 ft) in 1874 by a British expedition led by F. Crauford Grove and including Frederick GardnerHorace Walker, and the Swiss guide Peter Knubel of St. Niklaus.

While authorities differ on how the Caucasus are distributed between Europe and Asia, most relevant modern authorities define the continental boundary as the Caucasus watershed, placing Elbrus in Europe due to its position on the north side in Russia.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Elbrus